The Coral Trees of Matsushima

translated from the Japanese by

Along the shoreline, the mineral trees have risen from the sea like jeweled hands reaching for the sky. Further out, long branches of coral have joined above the waves, spiraling together into bright red and blue and green—fingers crossed for some imagined future.

Today is the day the world will come. From the window, she can see the media unloading cameras, plotting locations for coverage as they wait for her to arrive.

Her husband stands next to her as she prepares, watching the boats of fishermen gather around the trees, throwing nets and cages into the sea. Only three years ago, the ecosystem had nearly collapsed, the seas empty of the fish and oysters that once built their local economy. But her methods of salt-water electrolysis and bioengineered reef construction have changed all of that. Somewhere below the waves, grafters are fixing coral fragments to the mineral-rich cathodes of rebar and wire-mesh, enabling a new ecosystem to grow.

“You have a lot to be proud of, Mio,” Takeshi says. He can still remember when the trees and the reefs were nothing more than concept drawings, scribbled notes on pages. But they had risen out of that dream, enduring quakes and storms and the wars of neighboring countries, his wife’s lifelong ambition growing like the reef itself.

“I wish Keiko was here to see it,” she says, taking her mother’s gift out of her pocket and turning it through her fingers: a fragment of coral carved into her own likeness. She remembers how proud her mother had been, watching the city grow back to life, even as her own health had been failing. “This is all I can give you,” she had said, handing her daughter the coral piece. “But it contains all my love, my dreams, and my hopes. Someday you’ll pass it on, give it to someone you care about.”

She hadn’t understood that at first, telling Keiko that she would never let it go, that she would hold onto it forever. But then she realized what her mother had meant—inspiration had to endure.

From her window, she looks further out, where colored corals weave together like a mosaic between the islands of the Matsushima coastline. Out there, the waves surge against the trees, each impact sending a pulse of energy down through a rebar-mesh core to generate the output required for her coral structures to continue growing below the waves.

“She would’ve been proud of what you’ve accomplished here,” Takeshi says.

“I wouldn’t be here without her,” she says, remembering her mother’s stories of floods and famine, of struggling to survive for so many years. A few months before she was born, Keiko’s father and brother had been swept away by the sea. Her mother had been left without a home, cared for by her cousins in Tokyo for ten years, but all she’d wanted was to return to Matsushima so she could rebuild.

Mio had been driven by that same need, and for her mother’s dream not to be in vain. And here was something she would’ve been proud of, a city rising out of the sea itself, self-sufficient and strong.

She looks at herself in the mirror. There’s a light threading of gray hair now and creases in the corners of her eyes. There you are, Keiko, she thinks.

“Look at all those houses,” Takeshi says, pointing out to another part of the sea. “They’re growing very well.”

A long row of newly formed houses can be seen emerging from the sea. After the recent tsunami, thousands of local residents are already living in bio-rock homes and many more are needed. Only a few years ago, every kilowatt hour of electricity would produce .4 to 1.5 kilograms of growth, but with new methods of bioengineering, that rate has been accelerated. Now, they grow below the waves like shells in an oyster bed. When they reach maturity, they’ll be lifted out of the sea and given to those without homes.

She notices a film-crew gathering along the shore now, taking footage of the floating farms, where rice and other crops are growing on mineral encrusted plates.

“They’re waiting,” she says.

“I’ll be with you,” he says, reaching out for her hand.

She turns her mother’s gift through her fingers again—her love, her dreams, her hope for what their city could become.

“And I’ll be with you,” she says, placing the coral piece in her husband’s hand.

It gives her strength as she turns to face the world.

松島の珊瑚の樹

金子瑠美著

プレストン・グラスマン:訳

海岸線では、鉱物の樹がまるで宝石をちりばめた手のように海から立ち上がり、空に向

かって伸びている。さらにその先では、珊瑚の長い枝が波の上で繋がり、鮮やかな赤や青や

緑に螺旋を描いている。

今日は世界がやってくる日だ。窓から見えるのは、カメラを降ろして取材場所を決めな

がら、彼女の到着を待つ報道陣の姿だ。

漁師たちの船が樹の周りに集まり、網やかごを海に投げ入れるのを見ながら、準備をす

る彼女の隣には夫が立っている。わずか3年前、この海にはかつて地域経済を支えた魚や牡

蠣がいなくなり、生態系は崩壊寸前だった。しかし、彼女が開発した塩水電解法と生物工学

に基づくサンゴ礁の建設は、その状況を一変させた。波の下のどこかで、鉄筋や金網のミネ

ラル豊富な陰極にサンゴの破片を固定し、新しい生態系を育てているのだ。

「ミオは誇れるものがたくさんあるね。」とタケシは言う。彼はこの樹やサンゴ礁が、

単なるコンセプト・ドローイングや走り書きのメモに過ぎなかったことを今でも覚えてい

る。しかし、地震や嵐、隣国との戦争に耐え、妻の生涯の夢はサンゴ礁のように大きくなった。

彼女は母にもらった贈り物をポケットから取り出し、指で回しながら「ケイコに見せて

あげたいわ」と言う。それは、ミオの似顔絵を彫った珊瑚のかけらであった。母は自分の体

調が悪くなっていっても、街が元気になるのを見て誇らしげにしていた。「私があなたにあ

げられるのはこれだけなの。」そう言いながら母は娘に珊瑚のかけらを手渡した。「でも、

これには私の愛と夢と希望が詰まっているの。いつか、大切な人に渡してあげてね。」

彼女は最初それが理解できず、絶対に手放さない、ずっと持っているとケイコに言っ

た。しかし、その時彼女は、自分の将来に希望を感じている母の言葉の意味を理解した。

窓の外には、松島海岸の島々の間に色とりどりの珊瑚がモザイクのように広がってい

る。波が樹々にぶつかると、その衝撃のたびに鉄筋網の芯にエネルギーのパルスが伝わり、

サンゴの構造体が波の下で成長し続けるために必要な出力が生み出されるのだ。

「彼女は、君がここで成し遂げたことを誇りに思うだろうね。」とタケシは言う。

「母がいなければ、私はここにいなかったわ。」彼女は、洪水や飢饉、長年にわたって

生き残るために苦労した母の話を思い出しながら言う。彼女が生まれる数カ月前、父と兄は

海に流された。母は家を失い、東京の従姉妹に10年間世話になったが、松島に帰って再起

を図ることだけを願っていた。

ミオも同じように、母の夢を無駄にしたくないという思いに動かされた。そして、母が

誇りに思うであろう、海から立ち上がる自給自足の逞しい都市がここにあった。

鏡に映る自分を見る。うっすらと白髪が混じり、目尻にはシワが寄っている。こんなと

ころにいたのね、ケイコ。と彼女は思う。

タケシは海の向こうを指差して、「ほら、あの家並みをごらんよ」と言う。「よく育っ

ているね。 」

新しくできた家々の長い列が海から顔を出しているのが見える。先日の津波の後、何千

人もの住民がすでにバイオロックの家屋に住んでおり、さらに多くの人が必要としている。

ほんの数年前までは、1キロワット時の電力で0.4~1.5キログラムの成長が可能だったが、

新しいバイオエンジニアリングの手法により、その速度が加速された。今では、牡蠣の殻の

ように波打ち際で成長している。成熟したら海から引き上げ、家のない人々に提供するの

だ。

今、海岸沿いには撮影隊が集まっていて、鉱物を塗った板の上で米などの作物を育てて

いる浮き畑の映像を撮っている。

「彼らが待ってるわ。」と彼女は言う。

彼は「一緒にいるよ。」と言いながら、彼女の手に手を伸ばす。

彼女は母の贈り物を再び指で回す。母の愛、母の夢、母の都市への希望。

「私もあなたと一緒にいるわ。」と彼女は言い、夫の手に珊瑚の破片を置く。

そして、彼女は世界に立ち向かう力を得るのだった。